Where Did The Saying Out Of The Blue Come From?

What is the meaning of feel blue?

Be depressed or sad, as in I was really feeling blue after she told me she was leaving.

The use of blue to mean “sad” dates from the late 1300s..

What is the meaning once in a blue moon?

To do something “once in a blue moon” is to do it very rarely: “That company puts on a good performance only once in a blue moon.” The phrase refers to the appearance of a second full moon within a calendar month, which actually happens about every thirty-two months.

What is tickled pink?

informal. : very happy or amused I was tickled pink to see her.

Why is it out of the blue?

Out of the blue is an English idiom meaning “suddenly and unexpectedly”. You can use it when you are surprised by something that was not expected to happen. For example, … The meaning of the word “blue” is revealed by a longer (but much less common) version of the idiom: out of a clear blue sky.

What does a bolt from the blue mean?

A sudden, unexpected event. For example, Bill’s dropping his life insurance was a bolt from the blue for his wife. This metaphoric term alludes to totally unforeseen lightning or thunder from a cloudless (blue) sky. [

What does the idiom a GREY area mean?

Noun. grey area (plural grey areas) (idiomatic) An area intermediate between two mutually exclusive states or categories, where the border between the two is fuzzy. It exists in a grey area between legal and illegal. (idiomatic) A topic that is not clearly one thing or the other, that is open to interpretation.

What figurative language is out of the blue?

“Out of the blue” is evolved form of an old idiom “a bolt out of the blue” or “a bolt from the blue”. A bolt out of the blue also means something unexpected, like the occurrence of a bolt of lightning on a clear blue sunny sky.

What bolt means?

bolted; bolting; bolts. Definition of bolt (Entry 2 of 5) intransitive verb. 1 : to move suddenly or nervously : start. 2 : to move or proceed rapidly : dash.

What is the origin and meaning of the idiom can’t hold a candle to?

The phrase can’t hold a candle to has its roots in the 1600s, when the lowly apprentice to a master of a craft might only be fit to hold a candle in order to provide light for the master while he tends to a problem. An apprentice who was not even skillful enough to hold a candle for his master was worthless, indeed.

What is the meaning of the idiom out of the blue?

If something happens out of the blue, it is completely unexpected: One day, out of the blue, she announced that she was leaving.

Is out of the blue a metaphor?

My view: “out of the blue” is short for “like a bolt out of the blue sky”, a simple comparison with “like” or if you prefer the literary term a simile. … Comparisons with “like” or “as” are no metaphors.